Black Pride

Let’s Talk Opinion in conversation with Project O

Black-PrideLade T: “Black this, black that. We limit our competition to ourselves. If White people have awards and events for themselves only, there would be a lot of noise made but when black people do it, it’s okay and it’s Black pride.
I think it allows for mediocrity.”

http://aopinionatedman.com/2013/09/26/project-o-article-103-lady-t-lagos-nigeria-scheduled-for-9-26-1200/

Dear Lade,

Although I understand where you are coming from with this, the truth of the matter is that black people are still discriminated against, so positive discrimination simply attempts to redress the balance.

Is it an ideal solution? Of course not. It would be better by far if racism disappeared altogether from society, but in the interim, something has to be done to promote rights and opportunities for black people, and yes black pride too.

I’ve read a few interesting articles on black pride that I will share with you. I hope you enjoy them.
About UK Black Pride: http://www.ukblackpride.org.uk/about/mission and on how a new religion was born in response to oppression: http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/rastafari/history/slavery.shtml

You don’t have to agree with the premises of either, but it may make for an interesting read.
Warm regards and best wishes,
Vic

deaduramilade says: I’m not saying we shouldn’t celebrate non-white people (for lack of a better phrase) but we take it to an unnecessary extreme and we limit ourselves. For example, no one would say Mindy Kaling is one of the funniest Indian American comedians, they’ll say she’s one of the funniest comedians. Simple.
If she limits her competition to Indian American comedians, I don’t think she’d have actualized full potential.

studentlondon3 says:  I found your answer to question 6 especially interesting. Do you think we should stick to integrated events only? Personally I think it would help promote a sense of unity rather than the segregation I know many still experience – but that’s just me.

Dotta Raphels says: Hello Lade, bawoni? ekaro or ekasan…better still Kedu? for my peeps here, it’s all “hello” in dialects of my home land.
You my dear have made me so glad! I’ve been here and gone through a hundred and two entries and patiently commented on all…then OM gives me the icing with you…sweet!

Yes, it calls for mediocrity and as I’ve said here, many do not even know what black pride is, they use it as a crutch, but that’s another topic.
I love your insights and I admire your maturity and intellect…especially from one so young.

Keep on living and aspiring dear, a clear head and vision makes for a truly open way ahead and I thank you for putting your bit in here.

lensgirl53 says: Dear Lade, I have so enjoyed your post. (…) I also side with your answer to #6…we live in a world of double standards. What kind of statement does any one race make to be so intolerant of discrimination while touting to discriminate….not good.

And for a little humour:

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12 thoughts on “Black Pride

    • Dotta,

      Please allow me add my ha’penny’s worth. As has been said umpteen times, until we stop seeing colour and start being human, not people, this will not go away. Oftentimes it is the educated and affluent black person who propagates the problem of ‘racism’ or the behaviour of ‘being racist’ as we develop the PHD – PULL HIM DOWN syndrome with each rung of the ladder that we manage to climb. Call not religion either as being civilised or humane has nothing to do with it.

      Say it loud – we are black and proud and are a force to reckon. Kudos to events such as this but perhaps the issue is that we are comparing and competing as opposed to showcasing…my uneducated thots.

      Speak soon xx

      • Hehehe…yes the PHD is very rife in the Black community, no denying that gal. However, the PRIDE I speak about is far above race and political correctness.Perhaps my PRIDE may differ from others but fundamentally, this is the PRIDE those for preservation and uplifting of the heritage of a race; especially in these times when all that is negative commands the media and press. It’s good to see you here on Vicki’s blogg, be sure to visit often; this here lady has a mouthful to say 🙂

        Always great for the mind and body, and it’s right up your alley TEE…all you women with way too much activity in the medulla,lol

      • Thank you for the warm recommendation, Dotta, just lovely. I hope to see some more of Tee as well and I was looking for the follow button next to the name, but there doesn’t seem to be one. Curious.
        And you know what else has disappeared? Your Gravatar. There for the last message. Not there for this one. Curiouser-and-curiouser 😉

        I look forward to more of our debates. Will do my best to provide more topics for all to get their hands onto. Thank you for coming along for the journey. It’s a better one for it. 🙂

    • Hi Dotta, on the “testing” message, you gravatar appears. However, when I scroll down to your main comment, it’s once again gone. Strange. I’ve no idea how to explain it.

  1. Hi Vicki 🙂 was checking to see if my gravatar problem was solved.
    Now Lade made a good point on PO, and I think in other to understand the passion of Black Pride and why it’s very necessary to a black person in our society today, I have to take you back a little.

    Now I’m not an expert in Black history, both the U.K and U.S. , but I’ll touch on what I’ve seen in modern society. As a black woman, I have faced some discrimination and thankfully it was never from anyone powerful enough to impact the outcome of my well being personally or professionally: so I could live with such.

    However, in a world where there is a bombardment of media images of what Black represents to them, it many times leaves the impressionable amongst us, with not the best impression.

    Black Pride is not about groups or exclusions, but more to do with an education of a generation which has lost every tangible sense of pride in it’s heritage and ancestry, simple because there are some( unfortunately many in positions to impact) who deem it right to perpetuate hate and denigration of Black people.

    Lade will tell you in Nigeria, a country of Blacks, we face not the pride issue, but tribal issue; so you see man can’t help himself.

    If you Google BEAUTIFUL WOMEN for example, images of white Caucasians will fill the pages. As you go along, you’ll see the odd face of Rhianna or Hale Berry. It’s so sad that these two women are then repeated say after another fifty more white faces.

    Why? It’s because the media and industries have sent subliminal messages for decades that this is the image of beauty. History tells us of great Nubian queens and dynasties of great African Empires and conquerors, but sadly, these are not paramount in our educating system, to let these young men and women know they hail from good stock.

    It’s marginal to reduce the PRIDE to just racism and slavery…no, we don’t think its a perpetual suffering every white person has to stomach. Look around your locality, it’s everywhere.Images and beliefs of negative kinds, still based on ignorance that the black race is inferior.Now we all know scientist have claimed life began from this very dark continent, which makes us brethren all the way.

    In news media,industry, its all the same. It’s not that there are no black archives, heck Vicki, archives are crawling with them.Take a look at Hollywood and the Arts, the leader of the free world is a mixture of the two most beautiful colors we know; And Medical societies but to name a few, all have evidence of the Black mans contribution to humanity.The problem is a world which has refused to, or is slow to let go of hate and prejudice.

    An award winning Nigerian woman Chimamanda Adichie just published a novel,AMERICANA. The issue of hair comes up quite a lot in this brilliant book and yes! This is a big issue in our world. Just a simple but poignant example of PRIDE. Would you believe women have been demoted, denied employment and some ordered to change or remove what they refer to as KINK from their hair, or to put it bluntly, fix that eyesore.

    We are discriminated against for the hair and many young black women, my daughter included now don weaves of varying kinds in order to feel normal.

    My photo will show you a woman with long permed hair, but it’s actually a synthetic wig. I have no issues about my color, shape or hair texture, but I do like the variation of different hair styles and colors, that is from a 45 year old confident black woman. Confident because I have a background grounded on PRIDE, the acknowledgement of whom I am and the acceptance that I’m just beautiful.

    There are many who are not. They will come into it eventually I believe, but PRIDE in black comes up here. I know there are far too many arguments in this subject and justifiably so, but the notion of restitution and exclusions does not even begin to scratch the surface.

    In order to feel what a marginalized black person feels, one needs to live or know it. I do believe this exists in every cultural group, but one skin color in this world is seen as bad by far too many, that is the BLACK skin. It begins with this, but the impact reaches far beyond the color of ones skin.

    In order to teach our children, boost their pride and morale to take pride in self, we have PRIDE in the black community in the white man’s countries. Countries many of us were born in, raised in, know no other place than it as home; but in a drop of a hat, some ignorant will bellow you go bag to your ape land.

    This is where PRIDE comes in Vicki. I don’t know if I covered enough and I have taken a laid back approach to this, because it’s about the only way to do it, without going into extensive history and political debates.
    There are many foolish ones who hide behind PRIDE and are lazy and unimaginative to create their success and balance, I do not speak for them. I speak for anyone who will continue to advocate, facilitate, and encourage the sense of PRIDE AND DIGNITY amongst Blacks in any community. We need to carve out a platform to host and celebrate our ancestry, and in so doing, we preserve the heritage for our children, that is PRIDE.

    Racism, prejudice and hate is very much alive in our world. Unfortunately, the majority of those guilty of this euro-centric notions, are again the Caucasian. It’s a fact, a sad one but one still. I have PRIDE, Black Pride as may be, but believe me, mine and as many; is not to limit, exclude or cry racism. Our PRIDE is to educate and preserve a notion of a people verging on oblivion.

    • Amazing comment, Dotta, thank you so much. There is a lot to think about. You make so many good points, and I’d like to emphasise the ones on education and media. Education to me is always where the greatest change can be achieved, so you were right to indicate its shortcomings in the promotion of pride. And the media shapes the way we view the world and it must take responsibility and become more forward thinking when it comes to promoting equality – and I agree with you that even “standards” of beauty can have an impact. I won’t say much more, just thank you once again for an extensive and excellent comment. Warm regards -Vic

  2. I pretty much agree. That’s the point that the extreme rwnj’s around here don’t get.

    As a white person here in CA I think I have felt threatened because I was white one time. And that was in high school. And was surrounded by a gang of black kids that called me white boy, and wondered why I wasn’t in class.

    My friend Robert started doing karate moves (he really knew karate) and I said I’d fight one of the twins. They lived next to my best friend, and were small. haha. We’d played basketball alot and they knew I was bigger and stronger than them. They didn’t want to go first or really fight at all I think. So while we were arguing the campus cop came by and broke it up.

    Then my friend pulled a fake hall pass out, and we went to the library. While the gang went to see the Principal. I spent 4 years with those kids otherwise, in PE (athletes all had 6th period pe together) and no issues. Have no idea why on that day they decided to surround us….

    I was a pretty good Boy Scout for 3 years (lol) but Robert beat me that day with the fake hall pass….

    I suppose for 44 years now only one racial (destinction between “racial” and “racist” is doing pretty ok.

    I’ve heard tons of stories from black co-workers about the racism they experience very often.

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